Hypothyroidism, also known as an underactive thyroid, is a condition that occurs when the thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough thyroid hormones for your body.

The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland that is in the front of the neck. Thyroid hormones play an important role in your body’s metabolism.

Hypothyroidism is an underactive 
                 thyroid gland. The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland located in the front of the neck.
T3 and T4 hormones are important for your body. T3 
                 and T4 are found in nearly every cell in the body. They maintain regular heart rates, metabolism, and digestion.

Importance of T3 and T4

The thyroid gland is part of the endocrine system. This system produces, stores, and releases hormones into the bloodstream that directly affect the body’s cells. The 2 key hormones produced by the thyroid gland are called triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4).

  • Hypothalamus: produces thyrotropin-releasing
    hormone (TRH)
  • Pituitary: is activated by TRH and produces thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which signals the thyroid gland to produce T3 and T4

T3 and T4 hormones are found in just about every cell in your body. They are responsible for maintaining regular heart rates, metabolism, and digestion. You may have hypothyroidism if your thyroid is underactive and does not produce enough T3 and T4. In addition, some people have trouble converting T4 into the more-active T3.

It’s common for people with hypothyroidism to feel tired and cold, lose hair, and notice that their skin feels dry. They may also experience weight gain.

Is hypothyroidism
a common condition?

You may be surprised to learn that thyroid disease is very common in the United States. In the US, thyroid disease affects up to 30 million people, and almost 60% of these people do not even know they have a thyroid condition. It is estimated that approximately 12% of Americans will develop thyroid disease at some point in their lives.

Approximately 5% of the population have hypothyroidism. If you are female you have an even greater risk, since women are 5 times more likely to have hypothyroidism than men.

Hypothyroidism is considered to be a lifelong illness; however, it is a condition that can be managed with appropriate medical treatment.

Hypothyroidism affects about 15 million people in the US.

What causes hypothyroidism?

Common causes include:

  • Thyroiditis, which occurs when the thyroid
    becomes inflamed and swollen
  • Surgery that removes all or part of
    the thyroid
  • Radioactive iodine therapy, which is
    used to treat both thyroid cancer and
    hyperthyroidism, an illness in which too
    much thyroid hormone is produced
  • Radiation beam therapy that is used to
    treat head and neck cancer
  • Congenital hypothyroidism (being born with
    low- or non-functioning thyroid gland)

*Estimation based on the incidence in the current U.S. population.

Thyroid function

Your thyroid is one of your body’s most important regulatory organs. Too little thyroid hormone production leaves
you sluggish; too much makes you jittery. Below are some of the effects on your body of having too little thyroid hormone production.

Metabolism

Metabolism: People with hypothyroidism may have a slower metabolism, which may result in sluggish digestion.

Cardiovascular System

Cardiovascular System: When not enough thyroid hormones are produced, the heart rate slows down and circulation time is increased, which may make people feel tired and sluggish.

Musculature

Musculature: Inadequate T3 and T4 levels contribute to muscle weakness, cramps, and stiffness.

Nervous System

Nervous System: Low thyroid levels in your brain may produce "brain fog."

Temperature Regulation

Temperature Regulation:
The hypothalamus increases production of TRH when exposed to cold temperatures, which increases metabolism. The slowed metabolism and reduced circulation in those with hypothyroidism, along with constriction of blood vessels
close to the skin, may make the body feel cold.

IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

Thyroid hormones, including ARMOUR THYROID, should not be used either alone or in combination with other drugs for the treatment of obesity or weight loss. In patients with normal thyroid levels, doses of ARMOUR THYROID used daily for hormone replacement are not helpful for weight loss. Larger doses may result in serious or even life-threatening events, especially when used in combination with certain other drugs used to reduce appetite.

WHAT IS ARMOUR® THYROID?

ARMOUR THYROID (thyroid tablets, USP) is a prescription medicine that is used to treat a condition called hypothyroidism from any cause, except for cases of temporary hypothyroidism, which is usually associated with an inflammation of the thyroid (thyroiditis). It is meant to replace or supplement a hormone that is usually made by your thyroid gland.

ARMOUR THYROID is also used in the treatment and prevention of normal functioning thyroid goiters, such as thyroid nodules, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, multinodular goiter, and in the management of thyroid cancer.

IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

Thyroid hormones, including ARMOUR THYROID, should not be used either alone or in combination with other drugs for the treatment of obesity or weight loss. In patients with normal thyroid levels, doses of ARMOUR THYROID used daily for hormone replacement are not helpful for weight loss. Larger doses may result in serious or even life-threatening events, especially when used in combination with certain other drugs used to reduce appetite.

WHAT IS ARMOUR® THYROID?

ARMOUR THYROID (thyroid tablets, USP) is a prescription medicine that is used to treat a condition called hypothyroidism from any cause, except for cases of temporary hypothyroidism, which is usually associated with an inflammation of the thyroid (thyroiditis). It is meant to replace or supplement a hormone that is usually made by your thyroid gland.

ARMOUR THYROID is also used in the treatment and prevention of normal functioning thyroid goiters, such as thyroid nodules, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, multinodular goiter, and in the management of thyroid cancer.

IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION (cont'd)

  • Do not use ARMOUR THYROID if you have hyperthyroidism, overactive thyroid, uncorrected adrenal problems, or are allergic to any of its ingredients.
  • Tell your doctor about any other medical conditions you may have, especially heart disease, diabetes, blood clotting problems, and adrenal or pituitary gland problems. The dose of other drugs you may be taking to control these conditions may have to be changed while you are taking ARMOUR THYROID.
  • Tell your doctor immediately if you experience chest pain, increased pulse rate, rapid, strong, irregular heartbeat, excessive sweating, or any other unusual event.
  • If you have diabetes, check your blood sugar levels and/or the glucose in your urine, as ordered by your doctor and immediately tell your doctor if there are any changes.
  • If you are taking oral anticoagulants, blood clotting status should be checked often by your doctor.
  • Partial loss of hair may be experienced by children in the first few months of thyroid therapy, but this will usually go away on its own.
  • Tell your doctor if you are allergic to any foods or drugs, are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, are breastfeeding or are taking any other drugs, as well as prescription and over-the-counter products.
  • Use ARMOUR THYROID only as ordered by your doctor. Do not stop or change the amount you take, or how often you take it, unless told to do so by your doctor.

Please see full Prescribing Information.